Post WW2 (1950-Today)

Mary Larkin Dugan

Mary Larkin Dugan of Marlborough Village, East Marlborough Township, was the daughter of Joseph Palmer Larkin and Verna Hess Larkin, she was valedictorian when she graduated from Unionville High School, and later a teacher in the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District, retiring in 1993. She was placed on the Wall of Honor in the high school. She had Bachelor and Master’s degrees from University of Delaware.

H. William Sellers

H. William Sellers, was a leader of efforts to preserve the rolling beauty of rural Chester County.

As director of the Environmental Management Center of the Brandywine Conservancy from 1975 to 1998, Mr. Sellers helped pioneer a movement to ask owners of rural estates to sell or give away development rights - put their land in trust - so property would remain in its natural state.

Wawaset

Courtesty Chester County Historical Society

 

The village of Wawaset is two miles down-river from Northbrook.  It was called Seed’s Ford until 1834, named for Emmor Seeds, a farmer who owned the land across the river. It was re-named Seed’s Bridge after the West Chester-Unionville road spanned the Brandywine.  The Wilmington and Northern adopted this name when it built a station in 1870 at the west end of the bridge.  Thus it remained for only a few years, until it was re-named Wawaset.

There are two widely differing stories about this change of name.

Lenape

Lenape is another village associated with Pocopson, although the formation of the township out of part of Birmingham Township essentially divides the village.  It grew from a locality named Wister’s or Shunk’s Ford before a bridge was built over the Brandywine.  Then John P. Sager erected a mill on the east side of the creek, and the name changed to Sager’s Mill.  Eventually, that name changed to Sager’s Station when the Wilmington and Northern Railroad built a station on the west side of the creek.

Locust Grove

The village of Locust Grove was the dream of businessman Pennock Marshall, who wanted to establish a settlement that would resemble William Penn’s “greene country towne.”  He laid out three streets in a stand of locust trees and planned a total of twenty-nine lots.  But he was to be disappointed, and the village never had more than two dozen families. By 1847, the village could boast only a smithy and wheelwright shop, a shoemaker shop and a general store. 

Charlie Moore

 

 

 

Charles Moore, grew up in Pocopson Township and participated in the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland.  He won the gold medal in the 400-meter hurdle with a time of 50.8 seconds, narrowly missing the world record.

Alma Struble Interview

ALMA STRUBLE INTERVIEW

SEPTEMBER 17, 2001

 

 

CB:  This I an interview between Alma Struble and Carol Budzinski on September 17, 2001.  It is taking place in Alma’s home on Marlborough Rd. in Pocopson Township.  Alma has lived in the township how long, Alma?

 

AS:  I’ve lived here 53 years.

 

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